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rickwebb's tumblrmajig

Hi. I'm Rick. I write, advise, and invest.

Venture Partner, Quotidian Ventures / CEO, Secret Clubhouse.

Formerly Co-Founder Barbarian Group & Consultant Tumblr

rickwebb.net / On Medium / Music From My Past / Maps Without Alaska

Archenemy Record Co. / The Longbox Society / Rock Tourist

My Music Making / about my investments

Posts tagged startups:

At Quotidian Ventures, we are making a bet on entrepreneurs who know their industry, but don’t necessarily know the rules of the startup game or how to code. If you have a great business idea, but don’t know jack about the startup world and want to hear from some of the people who have made the transition, you should seriously consider attending this one day conference. It will be a good time. 

At Quotidian Ventures, we are making a bet on entrepreneurs who know their industry, but don’t necessarily know the rules of the startup game or how to code. If you have a great business idea, but don’t know jack about the startup world and want to hear from some of the people who have made the transition, you should seriously consider attending this one day conference. It will be a good time. 

jayparkinsonmd:

I’m presenting Sherpaa’s platform tonight at the NY Tech Meetup for the first time publicly. About 700 people are in the audience and it sells out in minutes. For those who can’t make it, you can watch the livestream. I’m very excited. Mostly because I’m just so proud of what we’re building— a platform that lets you very easily reach out to your Sherpaa doctors and lets our doctors power a new kind of virtual practice. And it’s also stunningly beautiful. We’ve got such a talented team. See you tonight!

This is so exciting!

jayparkinsonmd:

I’m presenting Sherpaa’s platform tonight at the NY Tech Meetup for the first time publicly. About 700 people are in the audience and it sells out in minutes. For those who can’t make it, you can watch the livestream. I’m very excited. Mostly because I’m just so proud of what we’re building— a platform that lets you very easily reach out to your Sherpaa doctors and lets our doctors power a new kind of virtual practice. And it’s also stunningly beautiful. We’ve got such a talented team. See you tonight!

This is so exciting!

sprintly:

A little more than a year ago we released Sprint.ly into private beta. In June we removed the invite code. Today we’re removing the beta tag. Over the last year we’ve been actively listening to our current (and former) customers’ major pains.

Those recurring and systemic pains could be summed up…

Circa launched today and I couldn’t be more excited about it.
Psyched to be a part of this. Congrats to Matt and his team.

Circa launched today and I couldn’t be more excited about it.

Psyched to be a part of this. Congrats to Matt and his team.

parislemon:

Over 12,000 views and 64 comments later, the consensus in this Branch thread is that we’re not in a “bubble”. Maybe the “bubble” side wasn’t fairly represented fairly, or maybe we’re just really not in a bubble. 

The one thing we all know for certain: more “bubble” posts are coming our way. No one, it seems, can help themselves. You can be wrong a million times, you just have to be right once. Everyone wants to be the one to “call it”.

Earlier, First Round Capital’s Josh Kopelman tweeted out a link to a post he wrote, rounding up “bubble” posts. It’s even funnier when you realize when he wrote it: 2007. And he has “bubble” talk going back to 2004. The best line comes from 2006:

Are we in a bubble? Absolutely.”

I read that whole post and the pro-bubble side wasn’t even close to being represented. We were in a bubble in 2006 too. It’s hardly tech’s doing that the rest of the market collapsed in 2006, and had it not, I’d wager things would be very, very different now. There were a disturbing number of faulty arguments in that thread. The most egregious is the pseudo-use of P/E ratios, while studiously ignoring the vast majority of tech companies who have no earnings and, thus, have P/E ratios that are effectively infinite (of course, a developer would take umbrage with that and point out that their P/E ratios are NaN, but most of them have at least a penny of income).

Sox is being weakened. If you’re in NY and hang out with hedgies, you absolutely know that more “dumb” money is going into tech. Bubbles happen in all markets, not just public ones, so selectively using P/E ratios from public tech companies only is an irrelevant metric. The IPO market is irrelevant - it’s weaknesses are based on the economy as a whole, and not tech. Tech is actually outperforming the rest of the IPO market. 

Anyone who thinks we’re not in a bubble answer this: what’s going to happen when the REST of the economy rebounds? 

Edit: I should also point out that i have absolutely ZERO personal interest in making this argument. Something like 80% of my net worth is tied up in tech startups. I’m screwed if a bubble bursts. I’m still in because I don’t believe the economy as a whole will grow enough in the next 2 years to let this bubble loose before I have time to get out. But it will happen. I’m not Romney rich, but I’d bet anyone on the other side of this argument the cliche’d $10k that when the beans are counted in 2016 or so, we’ll view this as another bubble.  

In all of these cases, the medium — a blog, Twitter, the Kindle, even the Internet itself — isn’t the important thing. It’s just a way of connecting people with things that matter to them, and with other people who matter to them. That is the real power, regardless of the medium.

Why the Medium Is Not the Message  (via courtenaybird)

I don’t debate what this article says, essentially, but as an intentional play on MacLuhan’s maxim “The Medium is the Message,” it’s kind of a mess. I recently re-read Understanding Media, for the book I’m working on. There’s a new critical edition out that helps immensely in understanding Understanding Media.

If you take the message behind MacLuhan and apply it to this article, it’s actually exactly backwards. MacLuhan uses the medium of the lightbulb as an example of a medium without a message. That medium, even without a message, changed our world, by bringing us the ability to work at night. Through this reading, MacLuhan would say, absolutely, that the medium is the important thing. Blogging, as Malik points out, totally changed the news industry. That’s the important thing. Twitter totally changed the way news was collected in repressive regimes. That’s the important thing. And the kindle is changing books. As Jonathan Ames put it the other day, “these gadgets are going to change the way novels are written and conceived, and I’m against change when it comes to things I do.”

Twitter, the medium, is very much the message in blogging, along with Tumblr. They are changing the way we blog. The fact that we’re still saying something is important, but they have lowered the barrier in how to say things. They’ve made it easier. And they’ve changed the conversation in the process. They’ve encouraged a simpler type of conversation and message, which is more incluive but has had an impact on more nuanced, lengthy discourse. The’re not “just a way of connecting people with things that matter to them and with other people who matter to them.” They shape the volume and strength of those connections. They change and forge the connections themselves. They’re not dumb pipes any more than electricity was just a dumb pipe for getting lamplight into your house.  MacLuhan would argue that THAT is the “real power” - the radical medium transformations and the impact we’ve had. 

(via courtenaybird)

Just counting work that’s on the books (never mind those 11 p.m. emails), Americans now put in an average of 122 more hours per year than Brits, and 378 hours (nearly 10 weeks!) more than Germans.

What’s the Matter With the Start-Up Industry?  (via courtenaybird)

I find it interesting that that list left out the Chinese, but not terribly surprising that the Koreans work about 500 hours a year more than we do. 

(via courtenaybird)

thenextweb:

Co-Founder and former CEO of SimpleGeo, Matt Galligan has set his sights on working with companies to give up a percentage of its worth to charity.
Along with investor Shervin Pishevar, Matt Galligan would like to think about dedicating a part of a company’s future to social good. Their project, 1% of Nothing, is now actively asking for startup founders and employees to pledge 1% of a company’s equity to a charitable organization or good cause that the company has specific interest in.
(via ‘1% of Nothing’ asks startups to pledge 1% ownership of company to social good - The Next Web)

This is a fantastic idea. If I have another startup, I am ALL IN. 

thenextweb:

Co-Founder and former CEO of SimpleGeoMatt Galligan has set his sights on working with companies to give up a percentage of its worth to charity.

Along with investor Shervin Pishevar, Matt Galligan would like to think about dedicating a part of a company’s future to social good. Their project, 1% of Nothing, is now actively asking for startup founders and employees to pledge 1% of a company’s equity to a charitable organization or good cause that the company has specific interest in.

(via ‘1% of Nothing’ asks startups to pledge 1% ownership of company to social good - The Next Web)

This is a fantastic idea. If I have another startup, I am ALL IN. 

arishahdadi:

  1. Take a deep breath. You’re part of building something awesome now!
  2. Realize you need malpractice insurance, then get malpractice insurance. No, really, do that now.
  3. Get a handle on corporate records, particularly making sure you have fully executed copies of everything; I highly recommend

This is awesome. I have been thinking about using VMWare or something to use workshare for YEARS but have never gotten around to it. Curious to see if you ever do and how well it works!